Everything 3D meshes data for Raptor talon shape and biomechanics fascinator 56267200abbb76dd41857f8635fe79f5 2018-07-05T06:30:40Z ["3D digital models reconstructed from CT scans of museum specimens. All specimens are located in Australian Museum, Sydney. Aegypius monachus is located at BSPG Museum in Munich, Germany.", "3D digital models reconstructed from CT scans of museum specimens. All specimens are located in Australian Museum, Sydney. Aegypius monachus is located at BSPG Museum in Munich, Germany."] ["3D digital models reconstructed from CT scans of museum specimens. All specimens are located in Australian Museum, Sydney. Aegypius monachus is located at BSPG Museum in Munich, Germany.", "3D digital models reconstructed from CT scans of museum specimens. All specimens are located in Australian Museum, Sydney. Aegypius monachus is located at BSPG Museum in Munich, Germany."] Adaptive Learning and Forgetting in an Unconventional Experimental Routine fascinator 709f869f7fa7951d7da053fba4af8e3b 2018-07-03T05:36:46Z ["Learning and forgetting were assessed concurrently in two experiments that involved the same unconventional routine. The schedule of reinforcement changed every session. Sessions were run back-to-back with a 23-hour mid-session break such that in a single visit to the testing chamber, the subject completed the second half of one session and the first half of the next. The beginning of a new session was either signaled or unsignaled. Experiment 1 involved concurrent variable interval-variable interval schedules with four possible reinforcer ratios. Response allocation was sensitive to the richer schedule and was retained through the mid-session break. Experiment 2 involved peak-interval schedules of varying durations. Temporal discrimination was rapidly acquired before and after the mid-session break, but not retained. Signaling the session change decreased control by past contingencies in both experiments, demonstrating that learning and forgetting can be investigated separately. Forgetting is often thought of as the inability to remember, but remembering and forgetting allow behavior to adapt to a changing environment in distinct and separable ways. These results suggest that the temporal structure of information can impact animals’ capacity to forget and remember.", "Learning and forgetting were assessed concurrently in two experiments that involved the same unconventional routine. The schedule of reinforcement changed every session. Sessions were run back-to-back with a 23-hour mid-session break such that in a single visit to the testing chamber, the subject completed the second half of one session and the first half of the next. The beginning of a new session was either signaled or unsignaled. Experiment 1 involved concurrent variable interval-variable interval schedules with four possible reinforcer ratios. Response allocation was sensitive to the richer schedule and was retained through the mid-session break. Experiment 2 involved peak-interval schedules of varying durations. Temporal discrimination was rapidly acquired before and after the mid-session break, but not retained. Signaling the session change decreased control by past contingencies in both experiments, demonstrating that learning and forgetting can be investigated separately. Forgetting is often thought of as the inability to remember, but remembering and forgetting allow behavior to adapt to a changing environment in distinct and separable ways. These results suggest that the temporal structure of information can impact animals’ capacity to forget and remember."] ["Learning and forgetting were assessed concurrently in two experiments that involved the same unconventional routine. The schedule of reinforcement changed every session. Sessions were run back-to-back with a 23-hour mid-session break such that in a single visit to the testing chamber, the subject completed the second half of one session and the first half of the next. The beginning of a new session was either signaled or unsignaled. Experiment 1 involved concurrent variable interval-variable interval schedules with four possible reinforcer ratios. Response allocation was sensitive to the richer schedule and was retained through the mid-session break. Experiment 2 involved peak-interval schedules of varying durations. Temporal discrimination was rapidly acquired before and after the mid-session break, but not retained. Signaling the session change decreased control by past contingencies in both experiments, demonstrating that learning and forgetting can be investigated separately. Forgetting is often thought of as the inability to remember, but remembering and forgetting allow behavior to adapt to a changing environment in distinct and separable ways. These results suggest that the temporal structure of information can impact animals’ capacity to forget and remember.", "Learning and forgetting were assessed concurrently in two experiments that involved the same unconventional routine. The schedule of reinforcement changed every session. Sessions were run back-to-back with a 23-hour mid-session break such that in a single visit to the testing chamber, the subject completed the second half of one session and the first half of the next. The beginning of a new session was either signaled or unsignaled. Experiment 1 involved concurrent variable interval-variable interval schedules with four possible reinforcer ratios. Response allocation was sensitive to the richer schedule and was retained through the mid-session break. Experiment 2 involved peak-interval schedules of varying durations. Temporal discrimination was rapidly acquired before and after the mid-session break, but not retained. Signaling the session change decreased control by past contingencies in both experiments, demonstrating that learning and forgetting can be investigated separately. Forgetting is often thought of as the inability to remember, but remembering and forgetting allow behavior to adapt to a changing environment in distinct and separable ways. These results suggest that the temporal structure of information can impact animals’ capacity to forget and remember."] Adolescent coping in Fiji: The Measure of Adolescent Coping Strategies (MACS) scale fascinator 8177b22c2f66bd1017792ad2b29fbb59 2018-07-12T07:11:44Z ["Aldur = age Kyn = sex (strakur=boy, stelpa=girl) Country_born = in what country were you born Tungumal = First language at home Background: Sveinbjornsdottir and Thorsteinsson (2014) have proposed a two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping with cross-cultural population application within the highest Human Development Index Categories (HDI) category, namely the Measure of Adolescent Coping Strategies (MACS). However, this measure has only had limited testing outside western cultures. The present study examines the outcome for MACS in the second highest HDI category using a sample from the Fiji islands. Method: The MACS was answered by 809 adolescents of diverse origins from different parts of Fiji. Respondents included 397 boys 12 to 20 years of age (M = 15.79) and 409 girls 13 to 19 years of age (M = 15.60). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results showed the MACS to have a reliable factorial and dimensional structure in Fiji. The pattern of findings for comparisons between boys and girls in Fiji was similar to that of comparisons between boys and girls in Australia and Iceland. There were no differences on the five MACS coping factors comparing mother tongue (Fijian and Hindi). Conclusion: the two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping was confirmed and the MACS was found to be a useful adolescent coping measure in Fiji.", "Aldur = age Kyn = sex (strakur=boy, stelpa=girl) Country_born = in what country were you born Tungumal = First language at home Background: Sveinbjornsdottir and Thorsteinsson (2014) have proposed a two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping with cross-cultural population application within the highest Human Development Index Categories (HDI) category, namely the Measure of Adolescent Coping Strategies (MACS). However, this measure has only had limited testing outside western cultures. The present study examines the outcome for MACS in the second highest HDI category using a sample from the Fiji islands. Method: The MACS was answered by 809 adolescents of diverse origins from different parts of Fiji. Respondents included 397 boys 12 to 20 years of age (M = 15.79) and 409 girls 13 to 19 years of age (M = 15.60). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results showed the MACS to have a reliable factorial and dimensional structure in Fiji. The pattern of findings for comparisons between boys and girls in Fiji was similar to that of comparisons between boys and girls in Australia and Iceland. There were no differences on the five MACS coping factors comparing mother tongue (Fijian and Hindi). Conclusion: the two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping was confirmed and the MACS was found to be a useful adolescent coping measure in Fiji."] ["Aldur = age Kyn = sex (strakur=boy, stelpa=girl) Country_born = in what country were you born Tungumal = First language at home Background: Sveinbjornsdottir and Thorsteinsson (2014) have proposed a two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping with cross-cultural population application within the highest Human Development Index Categories (HDI) category, namely the Measure of Adolescent Coping Strategies (MACS). However, this measure has only had limited testing outside western cultures. The present study examines the outcome for MACS in the second highest HDI category using a sample from the Fiji islands. Method: The MACS was answered by 809 adolescents of diverse origins from different parts of Fiji. Respondents included 397 boys 12 to 20 years of age (M = 15.79) and 409 girls 13 to 19 years of age (M = 15.60). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results showed the MACS to have a reliable factorial and dimensional structure in Fiji. The pattern of findings for comparisons between boys and girls in Fiji was similar to that of comparisons between boys and girls in Australia and Iceland. There were no differences on the five MACS coping factors comparing mother tongue (Fijian and Hindi). Conclusion: the two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping was confirmed and the MACS was found to be a useful adolescent coping measure in Fiji.", "Aldur = age Kyn = sex (strakur=boy, stelpa=girl) Country_born = in what country were you born Tungumal = First language at home Background: Sveinbjornsdottir and Thorsteinsson (2014) have proposed a two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping with cross-cultural population application within the highest Human Development Index Categories (HDI) category, namely the Measure of Adolescent Coping Strategies (MACS). However, this measure has only had limited testing outside western cultures. The present study examines the outcome for MACS in the second highest HDI category using a sample from the Fiji islands. Method: The MACS was answered by 809 adolescents of diverse origins from different parts of Fiji. Respondents included 397 boys 12 to 20 years of age (M = 15.79) and 409 girls 13 to 19 years of age (M = 15.60). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results showed the MACS to have a reliable factorial and dimensional structure in Fiji. The pattern of findings for comparisons between boys and girls in Fiji was similar to that of comparisons between boys and girls in Australia and Iceland. There were no differences on the five MACS coping factors comparing mother tongue (Fijian and Hindi). Conclusion: the two-dimensional theory of adolescent coping was confirmed and the MACS was found to be a useful adolescent coping measure in Fiji."] Adoptions from foster care through Family and Community Services (FACS) fascinator bc6be6dab8cfc8910a51054c09ecf3f0 2018-07-03T04:23:34Z ["The file contains raw de-identified data from administrative records from FACS in relation to children adopted from care in NSW from 2003 to 2014. The file contains demographic data in relation to the adopted child, the adoptive family and aspects of the child protection and adoption circumstances. ", "The file contains raw de-identified data from administrative records from FACS in relation to children adopted from care in NSW from 2003 to 2014. The file contains demographic data in relation to the adopted child, the adoptive family and aspects of the child protection and adoption circumstances. "] ["The file contains raw de-identified data from administrative records from FACS in relation to children adopted from care in NSW from 2003 to 2014. The file contains demographic data in relation to the adopted child, the adoptive family and aspects of the child protection and adoption circumstances. ", "The file contains raw de-identified data from administrative records from FACS in relation to children adopted from care in NSW from 2003 to 2014. The file contains demographic data in relation to the adopted child, the adoptive family and aspects of the child protection and adoption circumstances. "] An examination of co-composting aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated Manufactured Gas Plant soils fascinator 079e0d316c367efcba2c356d8452034e 2018-07-03T05:42:01Z ["The dataset contains a copy of current thesis following submission, folders divided up per chapter and within these chapters the files are stored into sub folders as applicable for the thesis. Predominantly, the bulk of the data was created using MS software.", "The dataset contains a copy of current thesis following submission, folders divided up per chapter and within these chapters the files are stored into sub folders as applicable for the thesis. Predominantly, the bulk of the data was created using MS software."] ["The dataset contains a copy of current thesis following submission, folders divided up per chapter and within these chapters the files are stored into sub folders as applicable for the thesis. Predominantly, the bulk of the data was created using MS software.", "The dataset contains a copy of current thesis following submission, folders divided up per chapter and within these chapters the files are stored into sub folders as applicable for the thesis. Predominantly, the bulk of the data was created using MS software."] Australian Gini Coefficients derived from taxation data fascinator 150c5937f901143811afeeebb7507219 2018-07-03T05:25:57Z ["The data are a collection of Gini coefficients derived from taxation statistics published by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The data are available at the national, state and gender level. PhD related and intended to correctly identify the relationship between income inequality an economic growth", "The data are a collection of Gini coefficients derived from taxation statistics published by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The data are available at the national, state and gender level. PhD related and intended to correctly identify the relationship between income inequality an economic growth"] ["The data are a collection of Gini coefficients derived from taxation statistics published by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The data are available at the national, state and gender level. PhD related and intended to correctly identify the relationship between income inequality an economic growth", "The data are a collection of Gini coefficients derived from taxation statistics published by the Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The data are available at the national, state and gender level. PhD related and intended to correctly identify the relationship between income inequality an economic growth"] Australian diabetes educators: Burnout fascinator 87bf626e4c1e92082219a118e7e575a8 2018-07-12T06:30:22Z ["Participants were 140 Australian diabetes educators, 131 females, age from 31 to 68. Measures included burnout, perceived organisational support, and social support. Demographic questions included: sex, age, personal diabetes status, hours worked, and geographic location. ", "Participants were 140 Australian diabetes educators, 131 females, age from 31 to 68. Measures included burnout, perceived organisational support, and social support. Demographic questions included: sex, age, personal diabetes status, hours worked, and geographic location. "] ["Participants were 140 Australian diabetes educators, 131 females, age from 31 to 68. Measures included burnout, perceived organisational support, and social support. Demographic questions included: sex, age, personal diabetes status, hours worked, and geographic location. ", "Participants were 140 Australian diabetes educators, 131 females, age from 31 to 68. Measures included burnout, perceived organisational support, and social support. Demographic questions included: sex, age, personal diabetes status, hours worked, and geographic location. "] Children with diabetes: Mothers’ quality of life fascinator 21be202eeea40a99fa1c4e9866f12961 2018-07-12T07:36:18Z ["Background: Maternal functioning and well-being are important aspects of a family’s adaptation to chronic paediatric conditions. Methods: This cross-sectional study investigated the difference between the perceived quality of life of mothers of children with diabetes (n = 63) and mothers of children without diabetes (n = 114). The study also examined the role of self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, number of social support providers, and satisfaction with social support in predicting quality of life. Results: Mothers that had a child with diabetes had lower quality of life measured by general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health than mothers that did not have a child with diabetes. Self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, and social support were significant predictors of quality of life measured by mental health. Conclusion: Implications for research and potential interventions are discussed.", "Background: Maternal functioning and well-being are important aspects of a family’s adaptation to chronic paediatric conditions. Methods: This cross-sectional study investigated the difference between the perceived quality of life of mothers of children with diabetes (n = 63) and mothers of children without diabetes (n = 114). The study also examined the role of self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, number of social support providers, and satisfaction with social support in predicting quality of life. Results: Mothers that had a child with diabetes had lower quality of life measured by general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health than mothers that did not have a child with diabetes. Self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, and social support were significant predictors of quality of life measured by mental health. Conclusion: Implications for research and potential interventions are discussed."] ["Background: Maternal functioning and well-being are important aspects of a family’s adaptation to chronic paediatric conditions. Methods: This cross-sectional study investigated the difference between the perceived quality of life of mothers of children with diabetes (n = 63) and mothers of children without diabetes (n = 114). The study also examined the role of self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, number of social support providers, and satisfaction with social support in predicting quality of life. Results: Mothers that had a child with diabetes had lower quality of life measured by general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health than mothers that did not have a child with diabetes. Self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, and social support were significant predictors of quality of life measured by mental health. Conclusion: Implications for research and potential interventions are discussed.", "Background: Maternal functioning and well-being are important aspects of a family’s adaptation to chronic paediatric conditions. Methods: This cross-sectional study investigated the difference between the perceived quality of life of mothers of children with diabetes (n = 63) and mothers of children without diabetes (n = 114). The study also examined the role of self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, number of social support providers, and satisfaction with social support in predicting quality of life. Results: Mothers that had a child with diabetes had lower quality of life measured by general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotional, and mental health than mothers that did not have a child with diabetes. Self-efficacy, relationship satisfaction, and social support were significant predictors of quality of life measured by mental health. Conclusion: Implications for research and potential interventions are discussed."] Conceptualising-operationalising expertise in independent schools: Teacher and leader perceptions fascinator 5d80f75c08ef8e8dafae08afd9b621ec 2018-07-03T04:17:01Z ["The project aims to conceptualise-operationalise expertise in teaching from the unique perspective of those participants involved in any aspect of professional practice in schools. If an increase in teachers’ expertise is to occur in schools, the professional’s voice is a crucial part of this aspiration. A better understanding of expertise in teaching, how it occurs and how it can be developed and improved for teachers in schools, enables advancement beyond the status quo. Data is being collected to capture the perspective of participants to inform this study. The research approach planned features two separate cases – teacher and leader – across three sites, utilising multiple individual and focus group interviews. The methodology is situated in an interpretivist paradigm and uses qualitative case study method. The sources of the data are teachers and leaders in three schools located in different states/territory in Australia. Participants volunteered to provide their perceptions of expertise as part of this research project.", "The project aims to conceptualise-operationalise expertise in teaching from the unique perspective of those participants involved in any aspect of professional practice in schools. If an increase in teachers’ expertise is to occur in schools, the professional’s voice is a crucial part of this aspiration. A better understanding of expertise in teaching, how it occurs and how it can be developed and improved for teachers in schools, enables advancement beyond the status quo. Data is being collected to capture the perspective of participants to inform this study. The research approach planned features two separate cases – teacher and leader – across three sites, utilising multiple individual and focus group interviews. The methodology is situated in an interpretivist paradigm and uses qualitative case study method. The sources of the data are teachers and leaders in three schools located in different states/territory in Australia. Participants volunteered to provide their perceptions of expertise as part of this research project."] ["The project aims to conceptualise-operationalise expertise in teaching from the unique perspective of those participants involved in any aspect of professional practice in schools. If an increase in teachers’ expertise is to occur in schools, the professional’s voice is a crucial part of this aspiration. A better understanding of expertise in teaching, how it occurs and how it can be developed and improved for teachers in schools, enables advancement beyond the status quo. Data is being collected to capture the perspective of participants to inform this study. The research approach planned features two separate cases – teacher and leader – across three sites, utilising multiple individual and focus group interviews. The methodology is situated in an interpretivist paradigm and uses qualitative case study method. The sources of the data are teachers and leaders in three schools located in different states/territory in Australia. Participants volunteered to provide their perceptions of expertise as part of this research project.", "The project aims to conceptualise-operationalise expertise in teaching from the unique perspective of those participants involved in any aspect of professional practice in schools. If an increase in teachers’ expertise is to occur in schools, the professional’s voice is a crucial part of this aspiration. A better understanding of expertise in teaching, how it occurs and how it can be developed and improved for teachers in schools, enables advancement beyond the status quo. Data is being collected to capture the perspective of participants to inform this study. The research approach planned features two separate cases – teacher and leader – across three sites, utilising multiple individual and focus group interviews. The methodology is situated in an interpretivist paradigm and uses qualitative case study method. The sources of the data are teachers and leaders in three schools located in different states/territory in Australia. Participants volunteered to provide their perceptions of expertise as part of this research project."] Crafting careers in a technology-enabled flexible work environment fascinator a0ca9a69f518ce01809df6fc04bd4d6a 2018-07-03T04:51:47Z ["54 interviews with flexible knowledge workers, employed within the information technology sector, and based in Australia", "54 interviews with flexible knowledge workers, employed within the information technology sector, and based in Australia"] ["54 interviews with flexible knowledge workers, employed within the information technology sector, and based in Australia", "54 interviews with flexible knowledge workers, employed within the information technology sector, and based in Australia"] De-identified DASS norms POV282 fascinator f8778f2c673e49a2eb3dee60a8c836e4 2018-07-12T07:14:06Z ["Data comprised of female partners of Australian combat veterans (N=282). Identifying information has been removed including the "number of deployments". ", "Data comprised of female partners of Australian combat veterans (N=282). Identifying information has been removed including the "number of deployments". "] ["Data comprised of female partners of Australian combat veterans (N=282). Identifying information has been removed including the "number of deployments". ", "Data comprised of female partners of Australian combat veterans (N=282). Identifying information has been removed including the "number of deployments". "] De-identified DASS norms three groups (POV50, SASR41, non-SASR38) fascinator 44dd1225a54d9cf18878e7fc59dcf9d4 2018-07-12T07:30:24Z ["Data with mental health (depression, anxiety, and stress) scores for three samples. Female partners: (a) random sub-sample of partners of Australian combat veterans, (b) partners of Special Air Services Regiment (SASR) personnel, and (c) partners of current serving military (non-SASR) personnel", "Data with mental health (depression, anxiety, and stress) scores for three samples. Female partners: (a) random sub-sample of partners of Australian combat veterans, (b) partners of Special Air Services Regiment (SASR) personnel, and (c) partners of current serving military (non-SASR) personnel"] ["Data with mental health (depression, anxiety, and stress) scores for three samples. Female partners: (a) random sub-sample of partners of Australian combat veterans, (b) partners of Special Air Services Regiment (SASR) personnel, and (c) partners of current serving military (non-SASR) personnel", "Data with mental health (depression, anxiety, and stress) scores for three samples. Female partners: (a) random sub-sample of partners of Australian combat veterans, (b) partners of Special Air Services Regiment (SASR) personnel, and (c) partners of current serving military (non-SASR) personnel"] Decisions about Care Priorities at the Final Stage of Life: Listening to Renal Dialysis Patients and Carers in Hong Kong fascinator e976420baf686dee77373a397f2c0194 2018-07-03T05:42:23Z ["Data supporting PhD thesis. Mixed methods sequential explanatory study design was used in this research study. In the quantitative phase, a survey with close-ended questions was conducted with both the dialysis patient and carer groups in a regional hospital of Hong Kong. The findings were then analysed and used to guide the qualitative component of the study; specifically, the questions to be asked during the focus group interviews. The qualitative data from focus groups generated different information, reflecting common versus diverse views that prepared people to deal with more sensitive issues related to end-of-life care.", "Data supporting PhD thesis. Mixed methods sequential explanatory study design was used in this research study. In the quantitative phase, a survey with close-ended questions was conducted with both the dialysis patient and carer groups in a regional hospital of Hong Kong. The findings were then analysed and used to guide the qualitative component of the study; specifically, the questions to be asked during the focus group interviews. The qualitative data from focus groups generated different information, reflecting common versus diverse views that prepared people to deal with more sensitive issues related to end-of-life care."] ["Data supporting PhD thesis. Mixed methods sequential explanatory study design was used in this research study. In the quantitative phase, a survey with close-ended questions was conducted with both the dialysis patient and carer groups in a regional hospital of Hong Kong. The findings were then analysed and used to guide the qualitative component of the study; specifically, the questions to be asked during the focus group interviews. The qualitative data from focus groups generated different information, reflecting common versus diverse views that prepared people to deal with more sensitive issues related to end-of-life care.", "Data supporting PhD thesis. Mixed methods sequential explanatory study design was used in this research study. In the quantitative phase, a survey with close-ended questions was conducted with both the dialysis patient and carer groups in a regional hospital of Hong Kong. The findings were then analysed and used to guide the qualitative component of the study; specifically, the questions to be asked during the focus group interviews. The qualitative data from focus groups generated different information, reflecting common versus diverse views that prepared people to deal with more sensitive issues related to end-of-life care."] Developmental pathway for individualized learning of algebra fascinator 45f4d8f9ebd2a44ae326f5b73b174d72 2018-07-03T05:55:08Z ["A qualitative study deriving individualised pathways of learning algebra and developing higher-order thinking. Investigating cognitive gaps in the presentation of the subject algebra and cognitive gaps in student approaches to algebra. Evidencing these gaps in comments made by HSC markers from 2002 – 2011. Providing a framework to explore processes underpinning cognitive gaps via student cognitive conversations structured on literature review, markers comments and particular domains of algebra. Leading to individualised pathways of learning, a new concept of understanding algebra and higher-order thinking.", "A qualitative study deriving individualised pathways of learning algebra and developing higher-order thinking. Investigating cognitive gaps in the presentation of the subject algebra and cognitive gaps in student approaches to algebra. Evidencing these gaps in comments made by HSC markers from 2002 – 2011. Providing a framework to explore processes underpinning cognitive gaps via student cognitive conversations structured on literature review, markers comments and particular domains of algebra. Leading to individualised pathways of learning, a new concept of understanding algebra and higher-order thinking."] ["A qualitative study deriving individualised pathways of learning algebra and developing higher-order thinking. Investigating cognitive gaps in the presentation of the subject algebra and cognitive gaps in student approaches to algebra. Evidencing these gaps in comments made by HSC markers from 2002 – 2011. Providing a framework to explore processes underpinning cognitive gaps via student cognitive conversations structured on literature review, markers comments and particular domains of algebra. Leading to individualised pathways of learning, a new concept of understanding algebra and higher-order thinking.", "A qualitative study deriving individualised pathways of learning algebra and developing higher-order thinking. Investigating cognitive gaps in the presentation of the subject algebra and cognitive gaps in student approaches to algebra. Evidencing these gaps in comments made by HSC markers from 2002 – 2011. Providing a framework to explore processes underpinning cognitive gaps via student cognitive conversations structured on literature review, markers comments and particular domains of algebra. Leading to individualised pathways of learning, a new concept of understanding algebra and higher-order thinking."] Early adolescents motivation and engagement in learning and impact of school-related conditions in low socio-economic districts in Sri Lanka: A mixed methods study fascinator 3cc369494583938a9dd42214e638544e 2018-07-03T05:52:23Z ["Collected quantitative data from 220 students in Kalutara, Colombo, NuwaraEliya, and Monaragala districts in Sri Lanka using a survey. And conducted interviews with 24 students, 12 teachers and 12 principals and collected qualitative data. Those data were used to reveal the motivation and engagement levels, differences among gender and ethnicity, school-related conditions, and motivational strategies taken by the schools to examine early adolescents’ motivation and engagement in learning and impact of school-related conditions in low socio-economic districts in Sri Lanka.", "Collected quantitative data from 220 students in Kalutara, Colombo, NuwaraEliya, and Monaragala districts in Sri Lanka using a survey. And conducted interviews with 24 students, 12 teachers and 12 principals and collected qualitative data. Those data were used to reveal the motivation and engagement levels, differences among gender and ethnicity, school-related conditions, and motivational strategies taken by the schools to examine early adolescents’ motivation and engagement in learning and impact of school-related conditions in low socio-economic districts in Sri Lanka."] ["Collected quantitative data from 220 students in Kalutara, Colombo, NuwaraEliya, and Monaragala districts in Sri Lanka using a survey. And conducted interviews with 24 students, 12 teachers and 12 principals and collected qualitative data. Those data were used to reveal the motivation and engagement levels, differences among gender and ethnicity, school-related conditions, and motivational strategies taken by the schools to examine early adolescents’ motivation and engagement in learning and impact of school-related conditions in low socio-economic districts in Sri Lanka.", "Collected quantitative data from 220 students in Kalutara, Colombo, NuwaraEliya, and Monaragala districts in Sri Lanka using a survey. And conducted interviews with 24 students, 12 teachers and 12 principals and collected qualitative data. Those data were used to reveal the motivation and engagement levels, differences among gender and ethnicity, school-related conditions, and motivational strategies taken by the schools to examine early adolescents’ motivation and engagement in learning and impact of school-related conditions in low socio-economic districts in Sri Lanka."] Economics Of Improved Seed Yam Production: Implications For Food Security In Cameroon fascinator 4dd119afc10d0c3ce25fce793794b58c 2018-07-03T05:52:44Z ["The data consists of responses to a survey questionnaire from the heads of 394 smallholder households located in the North West region of Cameroon. The purpose of the survey was to collect data on the characteristics of households who have, or have not, adopted the minisett technique (a technique for producing healthy ware (seed) yams) and data relating to production of yams (e.g. area planted, yield, quantity of inputs, and cost and revenue information). The full details of the data collected, the sampling procedure and a copy of the questionnaire are reported in the thesis. Data was analysed in order to establish the efficiency of minisett production and to explore the determinants of adoption of the minisett technique and the extent of that adoption.", "The data consists of responses to a survey questionnaire from the heads of 394 smallholder households located in the North West region of Cameroon. The purpose of the survey was to collect data on the characteristics of households who have, or have not, adopted the minisett technique (a technique for producing healthy ware (seed) yams) and data relating to production of yams (e.g. area planted, yield, quantity of inputs, and cost and revenue information). The full details of the data collected, the sampling procedure and a copy of the questionnaire are reported in the thesis. Data was analysed in order to establish the efficiency of minisett production and to explore the determinants of adoption of the minisett technique and the extent of that adoption."] ["The data consists of responses to a survey questionnaire from the heads of 394 smallholder households located in the North West region of Cameroon. The purpose of the survey was to collect data on the characteristics of households who have, or have not, adopted the minisett technique (a technique for producing healthy ware (seed) yams) and data relating to production of yams (e.g. area planted, yield, quantity of inputs, and cost and revenue information). The full details of the data collected, the sampling procedure and a copy of the questionnaire are reported in the thesis. Data was analysed in order to establish the efficiency of minisett production and to explore the determinants of adoption of the minisett technique and the extent of that adoption.", "The data consists of responses to a survey questionnaire from the heads of 394 smallholder households located in the North West region of Cameroon. The purpose of the survey was to collect data on the characteristics of households who have, or have not, adopted the minisett technique (a technique for producing healthy ware (seed) yams) and data relating to production of yams (e.g. area planted, yield, quantity of inputs, and cost and revenue information). The full details of the data collected, the sampling procedure and a copy of the questionnaire are reported in the thesis. Data was analysed in order to establish the efficiency of minisett production and to explore the determinants of adoption of the minisett technique and the extent of that adoption."] Eye movements and implicit source memory fascinator 30f65a62dc8f75739c93a6eabb27ebe8 2018-07-03T05:58:08Z ["Location URL: https://cloud.une.edu.au/index.php/s/bCKCJmFnk68ef1j - Abstract: During source memory studies, knowledge of some detail about the context of a previously experienced item or event is tested. Here, participants attended to different objects presented at different quadrants on a screen. In a later test phase, a single object was presented in all four quadrants, and participants verbally reported whether the object was new or previously seen (item recognition), and if it was previously seen, they indicated the original screen location (source memory recollection). We combined this test with eye-tracking to determine whether attention to an object during encoding would correlate with later recognition of the object and recall of its source location, and whether eye movements at test can reveal attention to the correct source location in the absence of correct explicit verbal responses. Number of fixations on an object during encoding was not related to later object recognition or source recollection. However, when participants correctly recognized an object but incorrectly indicated the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location than on incorrect, non-selected locations. Also, when participants correctly recognized an object but said they could not recall the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location. These findings provide evidence that accurate source information can be expressed through gaze direction even when explicit recollection or verbal expression of that information is incorrect or has failed. Format: Data files are accessible with Excel and EPrime proprietary software. Methods: Materials A total of 96 colored images of common objects were employed. The images were developed and described by Cansino [12]. From the pool of images, a set of 64 images were selected to be displayed during the encoding phase. During the retrieval phase, 32 images from the encoding phase were used again, along with 32 new images. The stimuli were presented on the screen of a laptop computer (1366 × 768 pixels; 60 Hz) using e-Prime software version 2.0. A Tobii Technology X2-30 eye tracker was positioned below the screen to track eye movements. The subjects were seated so that their eyes were 50-80 cm from the screen. Procedure The experiment was conducted in a single session that consisted of an encoding phase, a retention interval, and a retrieval test phase. Eye movements were tracked during the encoding phase and the test phase. Before beginning the study, each subject read and signed an informed consent form and filled out a computerized demographic questionnaire. Participants started the experiment by calibrating their eyes to the eye-tracking software. Once the calibrations were satisfactory, the encoding phase began, which lasted for approximately 6 minutes. The participants were presented with an illustrative encoding slide and instructed to study the objects that appeared on screen for a later test. After the illustration slide was shown, a series of 32 additional slides was presented. Each encoding slide was divided into four quadrants by a red cross. In two of the quadrants randomly selected pairs of objects were presented. Participants were not instructed to remember image locations or image pairings. Unknown to them, one of the objects from each slide would be part of the retrieval test (the target) and the other would not be seen again (the distractor). Quadrants that contained stimuli were always diagonally opposed: either top left and bottom right, or top right and bottom left (Fig 1, top panel). These screen positions, as well as the position of the object that would be presented again later, were counterbalanced across the session and presented in individually randomized orders. Before each new slide was displayed, the participants were presented with a fixation cross for 1000 ms to center their focus. Each slide was presented for 3000 ms, after which the images and the quadrants disappeared and were replaced with the message “press space to continue”. By pressing spacebar, the participant could then choose when they would see the next slide. On average, participants took 1439 ms to continue onto the next slide. Examples of stimuli layout. In the encoding phase (top panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented randomly in opposite quadrants. In the test phase (lower panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented in all four quadrants. Immediately after the encoding phase there was a ten minute retention interval. During this interval participants completed a distractor task that involved solving simple arithmetic problems. The participants were asked to select the correct count-down series by threes out of 3 options. They had to do this for 10 different numbers ranging from 17-32. For the test phase, participants were presented with test screens divided into four quadrants by a red cross. The same object was displayed in each quadrant (Fig 1, bottom panel). The subjects were first presented with a sequence of three illustrative test trials and advised that after viewing the objects in each trial they would be asked to either point with their hand to the quadrant that they had previously seen the image in, say “new” if they had not seen the image previously, or say “don’t know where” if they had seen the image before but could not recall where its previous location was. For each test trial, a fixation cross in the center of the screen appeared for 1000 ms before each slide was presented to enable the participant to center their focus. The objects appeared for 3000 ms, then they were removed while the red dividing cross remained. At that point, the verbal responses from the subject were collected. These verbal reports were recorded by the experimenter. The subjects were presented with 64 test slides, 32 of which contained objects that were previously shown in the encoding phase and the other 32 contained new objects. The sequence of new images and previously presented images in the test screens was individually randomized. Coding of responses The third author noted participants’ response as they were being given and later coded these responses according to the following guidelines: Correct item recognition – previously seen objects which were not labelled as new by the participant; Correct source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to the correct quadrant; Incorrect source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to an incorrect quadrant; Don’t know where – previously seen objects which were recognized but of which the participant said not to know the location; Incorrect item recognition – previously seen objects which were labelled as new by the participant. New objects could also be correctly identified as new or falsely considered to have been seen before. These were not analyzed further. ", "Location URL: https://cloud.une.edu.au/index.php/s/bCKCJmFnk68ef1j - Abstract: During source memory studies, knowledge of some detail about the context of a previously experienced item or event is tested. Here, participants attended to different objects presented at different quadrants on a screen. In a later test phase, a single object was presented in all four quadrants, and participants verbally reported whether the object was new or previously seen (item recognition), and if it was previously seen, they indicated the original screen location (source memory recollection). We combined this test with eye-tracking to determine whether attention to an object during encoding would correlate with later recognition of the object and recall of its source location, and whether eye movements at test can reveal attention to the correct source location in the absence of correct explicit verbal responses. Number of fixations on an object during encoding was not related to later object recognition or source recollection. However, when participants correctly recognized an object but incorrectly indicated the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location than on incorrect, non-selected locations. Also, when participants correctly recognized an object but said they could not recall the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location. These findings provide evidence that accurate source information can be expressed through gaze direction even when explicit recollection or verbal expression of that information is incorrect or has failed. Format: Data files are accessible with Excel and EPrime proprietary software. Methods: Materials A total of 96 colored images of common objects were employed. The images were developed and described by Cansino [12]. From the pool of images, a set of 64 images were selected to be displayed during the encoding phase. During the retrieval phase, 32 images from the encoding phase were used again, along with 32 new images. The stimuli were presented on the screen of a laptop computer (1366 × 768 pixels; 60 Hz) using e-Prime software version 2.0. A Tobii Technology X2-30 eye tracker was positioned below the screen to track eye movements. The subjects were seated so that their eyes were 50-80 cm from the screen. Procedure The experiment was conducted in a single session that consisted of an encoding phase, a retention interval, and a retrieval test phase. Eye movements were tracked during the encoding phase and the test phase. Before beginning the study, each subject read and signed an informed consent form and filled out a computerized demographic questionnaire. Participants started the experiment by calibrating their eyes to the eye-tracking software. Once the calibrations were satisfactory, the encoding phase began, which lasted for approximately 6 minutes. The participants were presented with an illustrative encoding slide and instructed to study the objects that appeared on screen for a later test. After the illustration slide was shown, a series of 32 additional slides was presented. Each encoding slide was divided into four quadrants by a red cross. In two of the quadrants randomly selected pairs of objects were presented. Participants were not instructed to remember image locations or image pairings. Unknown to them, one of the objects from each slide would be part of the retrieval test (the target) and the other would not be seen again (the distractor). Quadrants that contained stimuli were always diagonally opposed: either top left and bottom right, or top right and bottom left (Fig 1, top panel). These screen positions, as well as the position of the object that would be presented again later, were counterbalanced across the session and presented in individually randomized orders. Before each new slide was displayed, the participants were presented with a fixation cross for 1000 ms to center their focus. Each slide was presented for 3000 ms, after which the images and the quadrants disappeared and were replaced with the message “press space to continue”. By pressing spacebar, the participant could then choose when they would see the next slide. On average, participants took 1439 ms to continue onto the next slide. Examples of stimuli layout. In the encoding phase (top panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented randomly in opposite quadrants. In the test phase (lower panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented in all four quadrants. Immediately after the encoding phase there was a ten minute retention interval. During this interval participants completed a distractor task that involved solving simple arithmetic problems. The participants were asked to select the correct count-down series by threes out of 3 options. They had to do this for 10 different numbers ranging from 17-32. For the test phase, participants were presented with test screens divided into four quadrants by a red cross. The same object was displayed in each quadrant (Fig 1, bottom panel). The subjects were first presented with a sequence of three illustrative test trials and advised that after viewing the objects in each trial they would be asked to either point with their hand to the quadrant that they had previously seen the image in, say “new” if they had not seen the image previously, or say “don’t know where” if they had seen the image before but could not recall where its previous location was. For each test trial, a fixation cross in the center of the screen appeared for 1000 ms before each slide was presented to enable the participant to center their focus. The objects appeared for 3000 ms, then they were removed while the red dividing cross remained. At that point, the verbal responses from the subject were collected. These verbal reports were recorded by the experimenter. The subjects were presented with 64 test slides, 32 of which contained objects that were previously shown in the encoding phase and the other 32 contained new objects. The sequence of new images and previously presented images in the test screens was individually randomized. Coding of responses The third author noted participants’ response as they were being given and later coded these responses according to the following guidelines: Correct item recognition – previously seen objects which were not labelled as new by the participant; Correct source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to the correct quadrant; Incorrect source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to an incorrect quadrant; Don’t know where – previously seen objects which were recognized but of which the participant said not to know the location; Incorrect item recognition – previously seen objects which were labelled as new by the participant. New objects could also be correctly identified as new or falsely considered to have been seen before. These were not analyzed further. "] ["Location URL: https://cloud.une.edu.au/index.php/s/bCKCJmFnk68ef1j - Abstract: During source memory studies, knowledge of some detail about the context of a previously experienced item or event is tested. Here, participants attended to different objects presented at different quadrants on a screen. In a later test phase, a single object was presented in all four quadrants, and participants verbally reported whether the object was new or previously seen (item recognition), and if it was previously seen, they indicated the original screen location (source memory recollection). We combined this test with eye-tracking to determine whether attention to an object during encoding would correlate with later recognition of the object and recall of its source location, and whether eye movements at test can reveal attention to the correct source location in the absence of correct explicit verbal responses. Number of fixations on an object during encoding was not related to later object recognition or source recollection. However, when participants correctly recognized an object but incorrectly indicated the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location than on incorrect, non-selected locations. Also, when participants correctly recognized an object but said they could not recall the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location. These findings provide evidence that accurate source information can be expressed through gaze direction even when explicit recollection or verbal expression of that information is incorrect or has failed. Format: Data files are accessible with Excel and EPrime proprietary software. Methods: Materials A total of 96 colored images of common objects were employed. The images were developed and described by Cansino [12]. From the pool of images, a set of 64 images were selected to be displayed during the encoding phase. During the retrieval phase, 32 images from the encoding phase were used again, along with 32 new images. The stimuli were presented on the screen of a laptop computer (1366 × 768 pixels; 60 Hz) using e-Prime software version 2.0. A Tobii Technology X2-30 eye tracker was positioned below the screen to track eye movements. The subjects were seated so that their eyes were 50-80 cm from the screen. Procedure The experiment was conducted in a single session that consisted of an encoding phase, a retention interval, and a retrieval test phase. Eye movements were tracked during the encoding phase and the test phase. Before beginning the study, each subject read and signed an informed consent form and filled out a computerized demographic questionnaire. Participants started the experiment by calibrating their eyes to the eye-tracking software. Once the calibrations were satisfactory, the encoding phase began, which lasted for approximately 6 minutes. The participants were presented with an illustrative encoding slide and instructed to study the objects that appeared on screen for a later test. After the illustration slide was shown, a series of 32 additional slides was presented. Each encoding slide was divided into four quadrants by a red cross. In two of the quadrants randomly selected pairs of objects were presented. Participants were not instructed to remember image locations or image pairings. Unknown to them, one of the objects from each slide would be part of the retrieval test (the target) and the other would not be seen again (the distractor). Quadrants that contained stimuli were always diagonally opposed: either top left and bottom right, or top right and bottom left (Fig 1, top panel). These screen positions, as well as the position of the object that would be presented again later, were counterbalanced across the session and presented in individually randomized orders. Before each new slide was displayed, the participants were presented with a fixation cross for 1000 ms to center their focus. Each slide was presented for 3000 ms, after which the images and the quadrants disappeared and were replaced with the message “press space to continue”. By pressing spacebar, the participant could then choose when they would see the next slide. On average, participants took 1439 ms to continue onto the next slide. Examples of stimuli layout. In the encoding phase (top panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented randomly in opposite quadrants. In the test phase (lower panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented in all four quadrants. Immediately after the encoding phase there was a ten minute retention interval. During this interval participants completed a distractor task that involved solving simple arithmetic problems. The participants were asked to select the correct count-down series by threes out of 3 options. They had to do this for 10 different numbers ranging from 17-32. For the test phase, participants were presented with test screens divided into four quadrants by a red cross. The same object was displayed in each quadrant (Fig 1, bottom panel). The subjects were first presented with a sequence of three illustrative test trials and advised that after viewing the objects in each trial they would be asked to either point with their hand to the quadrant that they had previously seen the image in, say “new” if they had not seen the image previously, or say “don’t know where” if they had seen the image before but could not recall where its previous location was. For each test trial, a fixation cross in the center of the screen appeared for 1000 ms before each slide was presented to enable the participant to center their focus. The objects appeared for 3000 ms, then they were removed while the red dividing cross remained. At that point, the verbal responses from the subject were collected. These verbal reports were recorded by the experimenter. The subjects were presented with 64 test slides, 32 of which contained objects that were previously shown in the encoding phase and the other 32 contained new objects. The sequence of new images and previously presented images in the test screens was individually randomized. Coding of responses The third author noted participants’ response as they were being given and later coded these responses according to the following guidelines: Correct item recognition – previously seen objects which were not labelled as new by the participant; Correct source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to the correct quadrant; Incorrect source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to an incorrect quadrant; Don’t know where – previously seen objects which were recognized but of which the participant said not to know the location; Incorrect item recognition – previously seen objects which were labelled as new by the participant. New objects could also be correctly identified as new or falsely considered to have been seen before. These were not analyzed further. ", "Location URL: https://cloud.une.edu.au/index.php/s/bCKCJmFnk68ef1j - Abstract: During source memory studies, knowledge of some detail about the context of a previously experienced item or event is tested. Here, participants attended to different objects presented at different quadrants on a screen. In a later test phase, a single object was presented in all four quadrants, and participants verbally reported whether the object was new or previously seen (item recognition), and if it was previously seen, they indicated the original screen location (source memory recollection). We combined this test with eye-tracking to determine whether attention to an object during encoding would correlate with later recognition of the object and recall of its source location, and whether eye movements at test can reveal attention to the correct source location in the absence of correct explicit verbal responses. Number of fixations on an object during encoding was not related to later object recognition or source recollection. However, when participants correctly recognized an object but incorrectly indicated the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location than on incorrect, non-selected locations. Also, when participants correctly recognized an object but said they could not recall the source information, there were significantly more fixations on the correct source location. These findings provide evidence that accurate source information can be expressed through gaze direction even when explicit recollection or verbal expression of that information is incorrect or has failed. Format: Data files are accessible with Excel and EPrime proprietary software. Methods: Materials A total of 96 colored images of common objects were employed. The images were developed and described by Cansino [12]. From the pool of images, a set of 64 images were selected to be displayed during the encoding phase. During the retrieval phase, 32 images from the encoding phase were used again, along with 32 new images. The stimuli were presented on the screen of a laptop computer (1366 × 768 pixels; 60 Hz) using e-Prime software version 2.0. A Tobii Technology X2-30 eye tracker was positioned below the screen to track eye movements. The subjects were seated so that their eyes were 50-80 cm from the screen. Procedure The experiment was conducted in a single session that consisted of an encoding phase, a retention interval, and a retrieval test phase. Eye movements were tracked during the encoding phase and the test phase. Before beginning the study, each subject read and signed an informed consent form and filled out a computerized demographic questionnaire. Participants started the experiment by calibrating their eyes to the eye-tracking software. Once the calibrations were satisfactory, the encoding phase began, which lasted for approximately 6 minutes. The participants were presented with an illustrative encoding slide and instructed to study the objects that appeared on screen for a later test. After the illustration slide was shown, a series of 32 additional slides was presented. Each encoding slide was divided into four quadrants by a red cross. In two of the quadrants randomly selected pairs of objects were presented. Participants were not instructed to remember image locations or image pairings. Unknown to them, one of the objects from each slide would be part of the retrieval test (the target) and the other would not be seen again (the distractor). Quadrants that contained stimuli were always diagonally opposed: either top left and bottom right, or top right and bottom left (Fig 1, top panel). These screen positions, as well as the position of the object that would be presented again later, were counterbalanced across the session and presented in individually randomized orders. Before each new slide was displayed, the participants were presented with a fixation cross for 1000 ms to center their focus. Each slide was presented for 3000 ms, after which the images and the quadrants disappeared and were replaced with the message “press space to continue”. By pressing spacebar, the participant could then choose when they would see the next slide. On average, participants took 1439 ms to continue onto the next slide. Examples of stimuli layout. In the encoding phase (top panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented randomly in opposite quadrants. In the test phase (lower panel), a red cross divided the screen into quadrants and the stimuli were presented in all four quadrants. Immediately after the encoding phase there was a ten minute retention interval. During this interval participants completed a distractor task that involved solving simple arithmetic problems. The participants were asked to select the correct count-down series by threes out of 3 options. They had to do this for 10 different numbers ranging from 17-32. For the test phase, participants were presented with test screens divided into four quadrants by a red cross. The same object was displayed in each quadrant (Fig 1, bottom panel). The subjects were first presented with a sequence of three illustrative test trials and advised that after viewing the objects in each trial they would be asked to either point with their hand to the quadrant that they had previously seen the image in, say “new” if they had not seen the image previously, or say “don’t know where” if they had seen the image before but could not recall where its previous location was. For each test trial, a fixation cross in the center of the screen appeared for 1000 ms before each slide was presented to enable the participant to center their focus. The objects appeared for 3000 ms, then they were removed while the red dividing cross remained. At that point, the verbal responses from the subject were collected. These verbal reports were recorded by the experimenter. The subjects were presented with 64 test slides, 32 of which contained objects that were previously shown in the encoding phase and the other 32 contained new objects. The sequence of new images and previously presented images in the test screens was individually randomized. Coding of responses The third author noted participants’ response as they were being given and later coded these responses according to the following guidelines: Correct item recognition – previously seen objects which were not labelled as new by the participant; Correct source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to the correct quadrant; Incorrect source location – previously seen objects for which the participant had pointed to an incorrect quadrant; Don’t know where – previously seen objects which were recognized but of which the participant said not to know the location; Incorrect item recognition – previously seen objects which were labelled as new by the participant. New objects could also be correctly identified as new or falsely considered to have been seen before. These were not analyzed further. "] Factors influencing Barbervax ® immunity and effects on wellbeing and production in Merino ewes and lambs fascinator b58385e955b51a7ff54195218bed0e7d 2018-07-03T04:17:30Z ["The data includes WEC and antibody titre (Barbervax specific on ewes and lambs and H. contortus antibody titres on the ewes. Also included are bodyweight and BCS measures of ewes and lambs, parentage measures, pregnancy scanning and fleece data from the ewes. All data was collected over a 12 month period. The data was used to analyse Barbervax immunity of ewes and lambs and effects of vaccination on performance.", "The data includes WEC and antibody titre (Barbervax specific on ewes and lambs and H. contortus antibody titres on the ewes. Also included are bodyweight and BCS measures of ewes and lambs, parentage measures, pregnancy scanning and fleece data from the ewes. All data was collected over a 12 month period. The data was used to analyse Barbervax immunity of ewes and lambs and effects of vaccination on performance."] ["The data includes WEC and antibody titre (Barbervax specific on ewes and lambs and H. contortus antibody titres on the ewes. Also included are bodyweight and BCS measures of ewes and lambs, parentage measures, pregnancy scanning and fleece data from the ewes. All data was collected over a 12 month period. The data was used to analyse Barbervax immunity of ewes and lambs and effects of vaccination on performance.", "The data includes WEC and antibody titre (Barbervax specific on ewes and lambs and H. contortus antibody titres on the ewes. Also included are bodyweight and BCS measures of ewes and lambs, parentage measures, pregnancy scanning and fleece data from the ewes. All data was collected over a 12 month period. The data was used to analyse Barbervax immunity of ewes and lambs and effects of vaccination on performance."] Farmers, voluntary stewardship programs, and collaborative natural resource governance in rural Australia fascinator 1288373027cb3cc6c6a57465ffa0fbb6 2018-07-03T05:41:38Z ["Qualitative, semi-structured interviews and surveys of Australian 23 farmers involved in voluntary stewardship programs. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews of 7 non-farmer stakeholders (animal welfare and environmental NGOs, Regional NRM body, government, researchers). Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (ie those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia.", "Qualitative, semi-structured interviews and surveys of Australian 23 farmers involved in voluntary stewardship programs. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews of 7 non-farmer stakeholders (animal welfare and environmental NGOs, Regional NRM body, government, researchers). Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (ie those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia."] ["Qualitative, semi-structured interviews and surveys of Australian 23 farmers involved in voluntary stewardship programs. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews of 7 non-farmer stakeholders (animal welfare and environmental NGOs, Regional NRM body, government, researchers). Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (ie those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia.", "Qualitative, semi-structured interviews and surveys of Australian 23 farmers involved in voluntary stewardship programs. Qualitative, semi-structured interviews of 7 non-farmer stakeholders (animal welfare and environmental NGOs, Regional NRM body, government, researchers). Despite large financial investments by governments and farmers, as well as significant inputs of time, effort and goodwill, the ecological, social and productive capacity of the Australian rural environment is under threat. The nature of environmental problems, the limited capacity of rural communities and government constraints pose immense challenges of governance. Traditional governance measures (ie those centred on public laws) and purely private and self-regulatory forms seem unable to meet these challenges. This has spurred interest in collaborative modes, with the hope of combining the best of both the public and private spheres. Collaborative experiments are already underway in rural Australia, but there is a need for more empirical examination of how such arrangements work in practice. The great hopes attached to the success of collaborative governance are mostly theoretical or based on applications that may not be relevant to rural natural resources in Australia."] Fiscal policy in Australia fascinator 9110c267366358c36e5ef89bbc903ad9 2018-07-03T05:50:40Z ["Data set is the quarterly data covering the period Q1 1984 to Q4 2014. The data used to test the effects of fiscal policy on GDP, unemployment rate and housing price in Australia using vector autoregression (VAR) model. Main source from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), with a portion collected from OECD Stat_Metadata. The data pertain to economics.", "Data set is the quarterly data covering the period Q1 1984 to Q4 2014. The data used to test the effects of fiscal policy on GDP, unemployment rate and housing price in Australia using vector autoregression (VAR) model. Main source from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), with a portion collected from OECD Stat_Metadata. The data pertain to economics."] ["Data set is the quarterly data covering the period Q1 1984 to Q4 2014. The data used to test the effects of fiscal policy on GDP, unemployment rate and housing price in Australia using vector autoregression (VAR) model. Main source from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), with a portion collected from OECD Stat_Metadata. The data pertain to economics.", "Data set is the quarterly data covering the period Q1 1984 to Q4 2014. The data used to test the effects of fiscal policy on GDP, unemployment rate and housing price in Australia using vector autoregression (VAR) model. Main source from Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), with a portion collected from OECD Stat_Metadata. The data pertain to economics."] Global Geographic Reach: A Delphi study into the future of the airline industry fascinator 6d80447e43577f16420decdc1816f61a 2018-07-03T04:50:59Z ["The thesis data were collected across five sequential stages and based on a mixed-methods Delphi study. The five stages were: Workshop, Pilot Survey, Main Survey 1, Main Survey 2, and In-Depth Interviews. The latter two stages were only completed by defined experts, the parameters of which were established at completion of the Main Survey 1. Participants were mostly academics and postgraduate students with a knowledge and/or experience of aviation, although there were also smaller cohorts of aviation industry insiders and aviation industry consultants. ", "The thesis data were collected across five sequential stages and based on a mixed-methods Delphi study. The five stages were: Workshop, Pilot Survey, Main Survey 1, Main Survey 2, and In-Depth Interviews. The latter two stages were only completed by defined experts, the parameters of which were established at completion of the Main Survey 1. Participants were mostly academics and postgraduate students with a knowledge and/or experience of aviation, although there were also smaller cohorts of aviation industry insiders and aviation industry consultants. "] ["The thesis data were collected across five sequential stages and based on a mixed-methods Delphi study. The five stages were: Workshop, Pilot Survey, Main Survey 1, Main Survey 2, and In-Depth Interviews. The latter two stages were only completed by defined experts, the parameters of which were established at completion of the Main Survey 1. Participants were mostly academics and postgraduate students with a knowledge and/or experience of aviation, although there were also smaller cohorts of aviation industry insiders and aviation industry consultants. ", "The thesis data were collected across five sequential stages and based on a mixed-methods Delphi study. The five stages were: Workshop, Pilot Survey, Main Survey 1, Main Survey 2, and In-Depth Interviews. The latter two stages were only completed by defined experts, the parameters of which were established at completion of the Main Survey 1. Participants were mostly academics and postgraduate students with a knowledge and/or experience of aviation, although there were also smaller cohorts of aviation industry insiders and aviation industry consultants. "] Impacts of Ascaridia galli infection on health, immunity, productivity and egg quality of free-range laying hens fascinator 732818eabee81b5dc2880a4d631f61a7 2018-07-03T05:55:26Z ["Two experiments were conducted at Laureldale research farms. Hens were artificially infected with different doses of Ascaridia galli eggs. Impacts on health, immune response, productions were measured. Subsequently, hens were ranged on the contaminated ranges. The impacts of such naturally acquired infections were measured.", "Two experiments were conducted at Laureldale research farms. Hens were artificially infected with different doses of Ascaridia galli eggs. Impacts on health, immune response, productions were measured. Subsequently, hens were ranged on the contaminated ranges. The impacts of such naturally acquired infections were measured."] ["Two experiments were conducted at Laureldale research farms. Hens were artificially infected with different doses of Ascaridia galli eggs. Impacts on health, immune response, productions were measured. Subsequently, hens were ranged on the contaminated ranges. The impacts of such naturally acquired infections were measured.", "Two experiments were conducted at Laureldale research farms. Hens were artificially infected with different doses of Ascaridia galli eggs. Impacts on health, immune response, productions were measured. Subsequently, hens were ranged on the contaminated ranges. The impacts of such naturally acquired infections were measured."] Impacts of climate change on staple crops and their pests fascinator f1ae7c6b139482c404d1c2cfe5d2dd8f 2018-07-09T01:40:22Z ["The occurrences are mapped to see the current (historical) occurrence. This also can be seen in the figures of each article already published. The geographic coordinates are uploaded to the UNE cloud to add more support to the thesis. The article information is enough to reproduce our research. The data was collected to find the current (historical) suitability for the species under study. This information was collected from literature resources, web sites such as GBIF, PlantWise and for maize from a Mexican Institution named CONABIO.", "The occurrences are mapped to see the current (historical) occurrence. This also can be seen in the figures of each article already published. The geographic coordinates are uploaded to the UNE cloud to add more support to the thesis. The article information is enough to reproduce our research. The data was collected to find the current (historical) suitability for the species under study. This information was collected from literature resources, web sites such as GBIF, PlantWise and for maize from a Mexican Institution named CONABIO."] ["The occurrences are mapped to see the current (historical) occurrence. This also can be seen in the figures of each article already published. The geographic coordinates are uploaded to the UNE cloud to add more support to the thesis. The article information is enough to reproduce our research. The data was collected to find the current (historical) suitability for the species under study. This information was collected from literature resources, web sites such as GBIF, PlantWise and for maize from a Mexican Institution named CONABIO.", "The occurrences are mapped to see the current (historical) occurrence. This also can be seen in the figures of each article already published. The geographic coordinates are uploaded to the UNE cloud to add more support to the thesis. The article information is enough to reproduce our research. The data was collected to find the current (historical) suitability for the species under study. This information was collected from literature resources, web sites such as GBIF, PlantWise and for maize from a Mexican Institution named CONABIO."] Intended and Taught GNH-Infused Curriculum in Secondary Schools of Thimphu and Samtse Districts, Bhutan: A Mixed Methods School Effectiveness Research fascinator e6d53264b38a6ff46a12cd8061f78dfb 2018-07-03T05:58:32Z ["Quantitative data were gathered using a 6-point Likert-scale questionnaire from 22 government secondary schools of Thimphu and Samtse districts, Bhutan comprising 202 teachers. From the original sample of teachers (N=202) 12 volunteered for inclusion in semi-structured interviews. Data were collected from the secondary school teachers using tools such as survey and interviews.", "Quantitative data were gathered using a 6-point Likert-scale questionnaire from 22 government secondary schools of Thimphu and Samtse districts, Bhutan comprising 202 teachers. From the original sample of teachers (N=202) 12 volunteered for inclusion in semi-structured interviews. Data were collected from the secondary school teachers using tools such as survey and interviews."] ["Quantitative data were gathered using a 6-point Likert-scale questionnaire from 22 government secondary schools of Thimphu and Samtse districts, Bhutan comprising 202 teachers. From the original sample of teachers (N=202) 12 volunteered for inclusion in semi-structured interviews. Data were collected from the secondary school teachers using tools such as survey and interviews.", "Quantitative data were gathered using a 6-point Likert-scale questionnaire from 22 government secondary schools of Thimphu and Samtse districts, Bhutan comprising 202 teachers. From the original sample of teachers (N=202) 12 volunteered for inclusion in semi-structured interviews. Data were collected from the secondary school teachers using tools such as survey and interviews."] Internet addiction, psychological distress, and coping: Adult and adolescent populations fascinator 3080350a9bfd79116d456954afabee05 2018-07-12T06:19:28Z ["This data set covers 449 participants aged from 16 to 71 years of age from a wide range of English speaking Internet forums including social media, and self-help groups. Of these participants, 68.9% were classified as non-problematic users, 24.4% as problematic users, and 6.7% as addictive Internet users. The results indicated that among adolescents the main contributing factors to Internet addiction (IA) were: high use of discussion forums, high rumination levels, and low levels of self-care. For adults, IA was mainly predicted by: engagement in online video gaming and sexual activity, low email use, as well as high anxiety and high avoidant coping. Furthermore, problematic adult Internet users scored higher on emotion and avoidance coping responses while problematic adolescent Internet users scored higher on rumination and lower on self-care. Avoidance coping responses mediated the relationship between psychological distress and Internet addiction.", "This data set covers 449 participants aged from 16 to 71 years of age from a wide range of English speaking Internet forums including social media, and self-help groups. Of these participants, 68.9% were classified as non-problematic users, 24.4% as problematic users, and 6.7% as addictive Internet users. The results indicated that among adolescents the main contributing factors to Internet addiction (IA) were: high use of discussion forums, high rumination levels, and low levels of self-care. For adults, IA was mainly predicted by: engagement in online video gaming and sexual activity, low email use, as well as high anxiety and high avoidant coping. Furthermore, problematic adult Internet users scored higher on emotion and avoidance coping responses while problematic adolescent Internet users scored higher on rumination and lower on self-care. Avoidance coping responses mediated the relationship between psychological distress and Internet addiction."] ["This data set covers 449 participants aged from 16 to 71 years of age from a wide range of English speaking Internet forums including social media, and self-help groups. Of these participants, 68.9% were classified as non-problematic users, 24.4% as problematic users, and 6.7% as addictive Internet users. The results indicated that among adolescents the main contributing factors to Internet addiction (IA) were: high use of discussion forums, high rumination levels, and low levels of self-care. For adults, IA was mainly predicted by: engagement in online video gaming and sexual activity, low email use, as well as high anxiety and high avoidant coping. Furthermore, problematic adult Internet users scored higher on emotion and avoidance coping responses while problematic adolescent Internet users scored higher on rumination and lower on self-care. Avoidance coping responses mediated the relationship between psychological distress and Internet addiction.", "This data set covers 449 participants aged from 16 to 71 years of age from a wide range of English speaking Internet forums including social media, and self-help groups. Of these participants, 68.9% were classified as non-problematic users, 24.4% as problematic users, and 6.7% as addictive Internet users. The results indicated that among adolescents the main contributing factors to Internet addiction (IA) were: high use of discussion forums, high rumination levels, and low levels of self-care. For adults, IA was mainly predicted by: engagement in online video gaming and sexual activity, low email use, as well as high anxiety and high avoidant coping. Furthermore, problematic adult Internet users scored higher on emotion and avoidance coping responses while problematic adolescent Internet users scored higher on rumination and lower on self-care. Avoidance coping responses mediated the relationship between psychological distress and Internet addiction."]